Magazine of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Hartford Connecticut
Tuesday, April 25, 2017
enes
Persecuted Christians often choose strategy of survival, says study
Daniel Philpott, professor of political science at the University of Notre Dame, listens to a speaker during an April 20 forum at the National Press Club in Washington. Speakers at the forum released ...

Read more

Make persecution 'difficult for others to ignore,' cardinal says
Washington Cardinal Donald W. Wuerl speaks during an April 20 forum to release the findings of a study on responses to Christian persecution. (CNS photo/Bob Roller) WASHINGTON (CNS) -- With religiou...

Read more

Living Stations of the Cross draws crowd
Written by Administrator
Archbishop Leonard P. Blair leads the living Stations of the Cross with Msgr. Daniel J. Plocharczyk at Sacred Heart Parish in New Britain on April 14, Good Friday.

Read more

Pope to canonize Fatima seers May 13; October date for other saints
Portuguese shepherd children Lucia dos Santos, center, and her cousins, Jacinta and Francisco Marto, are seen in a file photo taken around the time of the 1917 apparitions of Mary at Fatima. (CNS phot...

Read more

Theater review: 'Come from Away'
NEW YORK – “Come from Away," the musical now at the Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre on West 45th Street, looks back at that harrowing day in our history, Sept. 11, 2001, and shows us how the tragedy of th...

Read more

Pope Benedict celebrates birthday with Bavarian guests, beer, pretzels
Retired Pope Benedict XVI makes a toast during celebrations marking his 88th birthday in 2015 at the Vatican. (CNS photo/L'Osservatore Romano) VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- A bit of Bavaria, including German ...

Read more

Persecuted Christians often choose strategy of survival, says study
Persecuted Christians often choose strategy of survival, says study
Make persecution 'difficult for others to ignore,' cardinal says
Make persecution 'difficult for others to ignore,' cardinal says
Living Stations of the Cross draws crowd
Living Stations of the Cross draws crowd
Pope to canonize Fatima seers May 13; October date for other saints
Pope to canonize Fatima seers May 13; October date for other saints
Theater review: 'Come from Away'
Theater review: 'Come from Away'
Pope Benedict celebrates birthday with Bavarian guests, beer, pretzels
Pope Benedict celebrates birthday with Bavarian guests, beer, pretzels

Latest Commentary

ARCHBISHOP

During Holy Week, we are going to celebrate the work of our salvation that once took place in time, and,...

LOCAL

The Archbishop’s Annual Appeal is about to embark on its 37th year of raising funds to help people in a...

WORLD

U.S. President Donald Trump is seen at the White House in Washington, April 19. (CNS photo/Kevin Lamarque, Reuters) VATICAN CITY...

ARTS

Andrew Garfield stars as Father Sebastian Rodrigues in a scene from the movie "Silence." (CNS photo/Paramount) WASHINGTON (CNS) – Actor...

FROM OUR READERS

Father John Pahl, pastor of the Church of the Assumption in Manchester, decided it was time to say thank you.

YOUTH

HAMDEN – Sophomore Mary Sarah Olson, right, has been chosen to represent Sacred Heart Academy at the Hugh O’Brian Youth...
It was born of desperation. My husband and I had two children under the age of 2, and I was so exhausted, I couldn’t see straight. As a mother at home, it was not uncommon for me to work 100 hours in a week. Peter often joked that he went to work to get some rest.

One day, I reached my limit. "Peter," I pleaded during a rare moment of quiet, "I need one night a week when I don’t have to cook dinner. I don’t care if we have Wheaties for dinner; I just need a night off."

Peter completely understood. "What do you think about sending out for pizza on Friday nights?" he proposed. The idea sounded wonderful, and so we began.

I lasted three weeks.

I am extremely thrifty, so the thought of paying someone else to cook and deliver my dinner at an exorbitant price seemed downright immoral.

It occurred to me that we had friends who made their own pizza, so I began picking their brains and fiddling with recipes. I searched out suppliers for mozzarella, tried pizza stones, experimented with toppings. It didn’t take long for me to create a decent homemade pizza.

Call me slow, but it was six months before it dawned on me: "Wait a minute. The whole reason we’re having pizza on Friday nights is so I don’t have to cook."

But it was too late; we were hooked on our homemade pizza. None of us wanted to give it up.

Thus was born a tradition. Our typical pizza includes sourdough crust, homemade sauce with tomatoes from South Glastonbury farms, and an assortment of toppings including grilled hamburger, toasted garlic and homemade pesto. I cook in bulk and freeze all but the dough.

Half a dozen years passed. In an extraordinary turn of events one summer, I found myself in the Intensive Care Unit of St. Francis Hospital, battling a catastrophic illness. When I returned home, I was confined to bed for several months. Our parents generously cared for our four small children during the early weeks. After that, the families pitched in to hire live-in help for a month and a half.

On our caregiver’s final day, Peter asked if she would create homemade pizza for us. Later, after a grateful good-bye, Peter fed the kids an early dinner and put them to bed. In the quiet of the evening, he and I sat down for the first homemade pizza since the crisis began.

But instead of eating, we just sat there and wept. The previous months had been such a dark time. My illness had dragged me to the brink of death, then saddled me with a grueling recovery. Peter was having nightmares. Yet there we were, staring at homemade pizza, which was our beacon of normalcy. After months that had been anything but normal, we were glimpsing the delicious ordinariness of life. We hadn’t realized how much we’d missed it.

Peter and I sat together that evening and poured out our gratitude to God. We prayed that God would help us cling to this thankfulness, that it not be washed away in the frazzle of life. We wanted to remember the sweetness of each day. We wanted to remain grateful.

Twenty years have passed, and hardly a Friday night goes by that I do not whisper that same prayer of thankfulness to God. Hardships abound, but God’s bounty abounds all the more.

And to think that all this gratitude arose from a weary young mom who needed a break from cooking.

Regina Cram lives in Glastonbury and is a freelance writer.
×
Catholic Transcript Magazine

READ THE LATEST ISSUE

aprilmagcover