Magazine of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Hartford Connecticut

Though snubbed by Women's March, pro-life groups still participate
Mary Solitario, 21, center, a Catholic from Virginia, joins a pro-life demonstration outside the U.S. Supreme Court prior to the Women's March on Washington Jan. 21. (CNS photo/Bob Roller) WASHINGTON...

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'We will be protected by God,' Trump declares in inaugural address
U.S. President Donald Trump places his hand on the Bible as he takes the oath of office administered by U.S. Chief Justice John Roberts Jan. 20. (CNS photo/Carlos Barria, Reuters) WASHINGTON (CNS) -...

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Knights' annual Mass celebrates all human life
Written by Mary Chalupsky
Archbishop Leonard P. Blair stands with the Hunter family of Wallingford following the annual Pro-life Mass on Jan. 15 at St. Mary Church in New Haven.  Shown are dad Jacob, holding Jude; mom Sar...

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Archbishop Blair among faith leaders honoring Martin Luther King Jr.
Written by Mary Chalupsky
Faith leaders, including Archbishop Leonard P. Blair and Auxiliary Bishop Emeritus Peter A. Rosazza gather with Rabbi Herbert Brockman before an interfaith service at Congregation Mishkan Israel in Ha...

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McDonald's near Vatican to give free meals to the poor
A worker crosses the street with her bike outside the newly opened McDonald's near the Vatican Jan. 12. The McDonald's will collaborate with Italian aid organization, "Medicinia Solidale," and the pap...

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Magi's journey reflects our longing for God, pope says on Epiphany
Reenactors dressed as soldiers participate in the annual parade marking the feast of the Epiphany in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican Jan. 6. (CNS photo/Paul Haring) VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- The Magi h...

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 Though snubbed by Women's March, pro-life groups still participate
Though snubbed by Women's March, pro-life groups still participate
'We will be protected by God,' Trump declares in inaugural address
'We will be protected by God,' Trump declares in inaugural address
Knights' annual Mass celebrates all human life
Knights' annual Mass celebrates all human life
Archbishop Blair among faith leaders honoring Martin Luther King Jr.
Archbishop Blair among faith leaders honoring Martin Luther King Jr.
McDonald's near Vatican to give free meals to the poor
McDonald's near Vatican to give free meals to the poor
Magi's journey reflects our longing for God, pope says on Epiphany
Magi's journey reflects our longing for God, pope says on Epiphany

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MsgrLiptak_TNThe Church in the United States has begun to use the newly translated English Missal (or, technically speaking, the new English Sacramentary, which together with the standard Lectionary, completes the unit known as the Roman Missal). Although inaugurated in America on the First Sunday of Advent, it has been in use for several weeks in at least three other English-speaking nations. By and large, the new translation has been generally well-received. In many respects, it seems, the 2011 version clearly represents an improvement over the 1973 text insofar as liturgical English is concerned.

An obvious example occurs in the translation of the "words of the Lord" (verba Domini), which constitute the essential formula for the twofold consecration of bread and wine. I refer, of course, to the modification, in the new translation, of the phrase "for all" with the more accurate phrase, "for many." "It [the Precious Blood] will be shed for you and for all so that sins may be forgiven," has been newly rendered as "the blood of the new and eternal covenant which will be poured out for you and for many."

No one, I think, has explained this modification better or more concisely than Pope Benedict XVI in his best-selling Jesus of Nazareth, Volume II (San Francisco: Ignatius, 2011. See pp. 131 sqq.). Pope Benedict, a world-class theologian in his own right, observes that the formula which Jesus articulated over the Chalice reflects three interwoven Old Testament passages; Exodus 24:8; Jeremiah 31:31 and Isaiah 53:12. The citation from Isaiah foretells a Suffering Servant (Ebed Yahweh, in Hebrew transliteration), who will effect mankind’s salvation while bearing the sins of many.

Now, in New Testament times, the "many" of Isaiah 53 clearly indicates a totality, but – in Pope Benedict’s words – this concept of "totality" cannot be equated with "all." More precisely, Pope Benedict notes, the "many" in Isaiah’s crucial passage spoken by Jesus at the Last Supper means the "totality" of Israel. Moreover, "it was only when the Gospel was brought to the Gentiles that the universal horizon of Jesus’ death and atonement came to the fore, embracing Jews and Gentiles equally." (p. 135)

Of course, there is also a translation problem in this context. Recall that both English versions of the Latin Mass (1973 and 2011) reflect the ancient Roman Rite Latin Mass. But even the Latin itself doesn’t warrant rendering the phrase pro multis ("for the many," or "for many") as "for all." Technically, therefore, the 1973 translation is not quite precise – to say the least. Besides, an ancient, perennial rule about liturgical translations is that they should be faithful, insofar as possible, to the original.

Which prompts another issue: simply speaking, the Roman Mass was not initially celebrated in Latin but in Greek. Greek, the language of the New Testament, was the lingua franca of the Roman world at least from the fourth century B.C., when the Greek emperor, Alexander the Great, conquered everything in sight. Furthermore, Greek was a highly sophisticated tongue, required for social advancement at the time. Latin didn’t begin to acquire respect until Cicero and Vergil made it artful. All this is important because liturgical translators must keep in mind the Grecian origins of the Roman Mass – as well as the Hebrew and Aramaic (which Jesus must have used for everyday discourse).

A bedrock tenet of Catholic doctrine is the universality of salvation; Christ our Lord came to save all persons in principle. This is a Biblical datum; see 1 Timothy, 1:15. However, even God can’t save one who absolutely refuses to be saved, one who totally rejects the grace of conversion, in other words. Thus, while St. Paul reveals that everyone is predestined to glory – read Ephesians and Romans, especially – God awaits each person’s assent given in freedom, with which he never tampers, much less interferes.

Msgr. David Q. Liptak is Executive Editor of The Catholic Transcript and censor librorum for the Archdiocese of Hartford.