Catholic Transcript Magazine of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Hartford Connecticut

As we celebrate the 175th Anniversary of the Archdiocese, we look back… on July 23, 1976 when Archbishop Henry J. O'Brien passed away.
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bible study 862994 fbOne summer in my college years, I worked the morning shift at a local gym to earn some extra money. Each day when I arrived at 4:25 a.m., without fail, the regulars were already there, waiting for me.

I was always in awe of those dedicated few, and while they never said anything, I know they were not thrilled when I showed up at 4:31, a minute after the gym was supposed to open, because I hadn’t biked there fast enough or had hit the snooze button.

These people were dedicated to their physical health in a way that many of us can’t understand. I know I certainly can’t, and I even raced on a triathlon team in college. There are plenty of gym rats and exercise nuts out there, but how many do you know who arrive at the gym at a time many of us still consider the middle of the night?

When I stop to think about my own habits — personal fitness, spiritual fitness, diet, exercise and such — those early morning risers come to mind. I’m not thinking of rushing to the gym in the wee hours of the morning anytime soon, but it does make me stop and wonder about how I can be more disciplined, and what areas I maybe should pay more attention to.

There are examples galore of ways to aid in physical well-being at the start of a new year. Just ask the membership staff at the local gym what their favorite time of year is. But, I would guess that church attendance doesn’t surge the same way every January. Are there ways we can exercise more of our spiritual health in the new year?

If Sunday church attendance is already a habit, there are plenty of other ways to engage more fully in our spiritual lives this coming year. It could be making it to a daily Mass or special prayer service once a week. Maybe, for some, it’s getting to Mass on all of the holy days of obligation in 2017. Maybe it’s adding another five- or 10-minute period of prayer time to our day. Maybe it’s cracking open a Bible more often, or, as in my case, really, at all. Maybe it’s considering a return to confession.

Advent and Lent are common periods to set the spiritual reset button, try something new or engage in an activity or fasting that will bring us closer to God. Is there something you can put on your resolution list as an addendum this year? Or something that can be a new addition altogether? Is there something that probably shouldn’t wait until the month and a half before Easter?

At the start of 2016, my husband and I decided we were going to make resolutions that catered to three aspects of our health: emotional, physical and spiritual. We decided to make a poster with a list of things we wanted to accomplish in the year, and we weren’t going to shy away from any idea, no matter how unlikely it seemed. A tougher list would just push us harder to follow through, we said.

Well, it seems even making the poster was too ambitious, because I found the poster board in our closet the other day. It’s still blank.

But that poster board is actually going to make it to the wall this year, and with a little luck, hard  work and some of that channeled energy from those summer gym rats, we may be able to look at it again a year from  now knowing that we at least accomplished our spiritual health goals for 2017.

Anna Jonesis a writer who lives in New Haven. She and her husband are members of the St. Thomas More Chapel and Center community at Yale University.

alertAt the Spring Assembly of the U.S. bishops, Cardinal Joseph Tobin suggested that a delegation ofbishops go to the border to see for themselves what was happening to newly arrived immigrants, families and children. On July 1 and 2, Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, president of the U.S. bishops conference, and five other bishops conducted a pastoral visit to the diocese of Brownsville, Texas. Stops included Mass at the Shrine of Our Lady of San Juan del Valle with the community, a visit to anHHS/OBR Shelter and Mass for the families there, a visit to the Customs and Border Patrol processing center in McAllen, TX, and a press conference at the end of their visit. Catholic News Service accompanied the bishops on their border trip. 

  1. Backgrounder and analysis of the bishops’ trip to the border: Cardinal DiNardo told CNS, “You cannot look at immigration as an abstraction when you meet” the people behind the issue.
  2. At final press conference, Cardinal Daniel Dinardo said the church was willing to be part of any conversation to find humane solutions because even a policy of detaining families together in facilities caused “concern.”
  3. Bishops serve soup to immigrant families at a center run by Catholic Charities and listen to their stories. Scranton Bishop Joseph Bambera said he found hope in hearing the people in the room talk about what’s ahead. They didn’t speak of making money but of finding safety for their children, he said, driven by “the most basic instinct to protect your family.”
  4. At an opening Mass he Basilica of Our Lady of San Juan del Valle-National Shrine near McAllen, Texas, Bishop Daniel Flores of Brownsville told Massgoers, “The bishops are visiting here so they can stop and look and talk to people and understand, especially the suffering of many who are amongst us,”

A delegation of U.S. bishops goes on a fact-finding mission at the U.S.-Mexican border to learn more about Central American immigration detention.

Following their visit to an immigrant detention center, U.S. bishops said they are even more determined to call on Congress for comprehensive immigration reform.