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20170920T1442 11686 CNS MEXICO EARTHQUAKE CARITAS 800CNS photo/Francisco Guasco, EPA The destroyed church of Santiago Apostol is seen Sept. 20 after an earthquake hit Atzala, Mexico. At least 11 people died in the church during a baptism at the time of the magnitude 7.1 earthquake. (CNS photo/Francisco Guasco, EPA) MEXICO CITY (CNS) -- A Catholic bishop and a Caritas worker in Mexico said the situation was extremely serious after the Sept. 19 earthquake, and much aid would be needed.

"The situation is complicated, because the first earthquake (Sept. 7) had already affected thousands of people in Chiapas and Oaxaca," Alberto Arciniega, head of communications for Caritas Mexico, told Catholic News Service Sept. 20. "The church is continuing to assist those dioceses, but with what happened yesterday, the emergency situation is being re-evaluated to get a more exact assessment of the aid that is needed."

All the dioceses in Mexico were collecting food, water and other necessities for victims of the quakes, said Arciniega. He said they were seeking economic support from inside and outside the country.

"We know it is a serious situation, and international aid is being requested," Arciniega told Catholic News Service.

"Rehabilitation and reconstruction will take time and will be expensive," he added. "Thousands of people have been left homeless, and many churches have been damaged."

The magnitude 7.1 quake that hit Sept. 19 was not as strong as the earlier magnitude 8.1 quake, but the second quake was centered in Puebla state, just southeast of Mexico City, as opposed to in the Pacific Ocean. Arciniega said Puebla and Morelos states and Mexico City were worst hit in the second quake.

Arciniega shared audio of an interview with Bishop Ramon Castro Castro of Cuernavaca, in Morelos state.

The bishop reported "many deaths" and "many churches damaged." He said one colonial-era church collapsed but added, "Miraculously, the priests escaped safely."

Bishop Castro said parishes in his diocese had been collecting items to send to victims of the Sept. 7 earthquake in Chiapas and Oaxaca. Now those items -- if they were not destroyed in the Sept. 19 quake -- will be used locally, the bishop said, adding, "but it will not be enough."

He said one priest was taken to the hospital with serious injuries after his church collapsed; another was rescued from the rubble.

"There is a great deal of solidarity, thank God, but it is not enough. This is a serious disaster," Bishop Castro said.

Economic aid is important for "people who have been left homeless, who have been left with nothing, absolutely nothing."

"I am on my way now to visit the areas that have suffered the greatest damage, to try to convey a message of encouragement and hope," he said.

Arciniega was in Oaxaca when he spoke to CNS. He said the Sept. 19 earthquake was felt there, but apparently did not cause damage.

"People (in the south) are worried that the assistance will stop because the cameras and newscasts are focusing on Mexico City. There is fear that the aid will stop and the emphasis will be on the center of the country," he said.

He added that it was raining in Tehuantepec, an area of Oaxaca damaged in the first earthquake.

"That makes the housing situation more complicated. Not only did people's homes collapse, but now it's raining, so people are in shelters, they need food. They are setting up community kitchens. We are continuing to evaluate how much the diocese can do to help itself and requesting aid from other dioceses and from outside the country."

alertAt the Spring Assembly of the U.S. bishops, Cardinal Joseph Tobin suggested that a delegation ofbishops go to the border to see for themselves what was happening to newly arrived immigrants, families and children. On July 1 and 2, Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, president of the U.S. bishops conference, and five other bishops conducted a pastoral visit to the diocese of Brownsville, Texas. Stops included Mass at the Shrine of Our Lady of San Juan del Valle with the community, a visit to anHHS/OBR Shelter and Mass for the families there, a visit to the Customs and Border Patrol processing center in McAllen, TX, and a press conference at the end of their visit. Catholic News Service accompanied the bishops on their border trip. 

  1. Backgrounder and analysis of the bishops’ trip to the border: Cardinal DiNardo told CNS, “You cannot look at immigration as an abstraction when you meet” the people behind the issue.
  2. At final press conference, Cardinal Daniel Dinardo said the church was willing to be part of any conversation to find humane solutions because even a policy of detaining families together in facilities caused “concern.”
  3. Bishops serve soup to immigrant families at a center run by Catholic Charities and listen to their stories. Scranton Bishop Joseph Bambera said he found hope in hearing the people in the room talk about what’s ahead. They didn’t speak of making money but of finding safety for their children, he said, driven by “the most basic instinct to protect your family.”
  4. At an opening Mass he Basilica of Our Lady of San Juan del Valle-National Shrine near McAllen, Texas, Bishop Daniel Flores of Brownsville told Massgoers, “The bishops are visiting here so they can stop and look and talk to people and understand, especially the suffering of many who are amongst us,”

A delegation of U.S. bishops goes on a fact-finding mission at the U.S.-Mexican border to learn more about Central American immigration detention.

Following their visit to an immigrant detention center, U.S. bishops said they are even more determined to call on Congress for comprehensive immigration reform.