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20180710T1330 18280 CNS PHILIPPINES BISHOPS PRAYER 800Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte, right, greets Archbishop Romulo Valles of Davao, president of the Catholic Bishops' Conference of the Philippines, before a meeting inside the presidential palace in Manila. (CNS photo/Rey Baniquet, Presidential Photographers Division via EPA) MANILA, Philippines (CNS) -- Outspoken Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte is to curb his tirades against the Catholic Church after agreeing to a moratorium on statements deriding priests and bishops.

Ucanews.com reported the presidential palace announced the president's decision after a 30-minute meeting July 9 between Duterte and Archbishop Romulo Valles of Davao, president of the Catholic Bishops' Conference of the Philippines.

The president has drawn flak from Catholics for calling God "stupid" in a speech and for spewing diatribes against Catholic bishops and priests in recent months.

A day after the meeting, however, Harry Roque, the president's spokesman, said Duterte wanted church leaders to stop criticizing his administration, ucanews.com reported.

"Given there is separation of church and state, (church leaders) should not use the pulpit to criticize his administration," said Roque, quoting the president.

Duterte's meeting with Archbishop Valles came after the Catholic bishops' conference released a statement lambasting a wave of killings over the past two years.

Roque described the statement as "very tame," adding that it's "nothing new" because "there was no outright condemnation."

"I was expecting the worst, it was a very tame pastoral letter, I thought," he said, adding that the church leaders might be avoiding "outright confrontation" with the government.

Before meeting Duterte, Archbishop Valles said he accepted the "gracious invitation" of the president for a dialogue "because as bishops, we are open to listen to one another with respect."

On June 25, Duterte formed a committee to hold dialogue with leaders of the Catholic Church following his controversial remarks about God.

Archbishop Valles, who is known to be a friend of Duterte, said he did not prepare an agenda for the meeting.

"Remember that the invitation came from them. We will just play it by ear," he said. He added that the meeting was "an initial step" and that church leaders were ready to listen to Duterte.

The bishops' pastoral letter after their plenary assembly expressed concern over a host of social problems faced by the Filipino people.

Even as it enumerated human rights abuses and threats to the lives of the clergy, the letter also underscored the partnership between the government and the church.

alertAt the Spring Assembly of the U.S. bishops, Cardinal Joseph Tobin suggested that a delegation ofbishops go to the border to see for themselves what was happening to newly arrived immigrants, families and children. On July 1 and 2, Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, president of the U.S. bishops conference, and five other bishops conducted a pastoral visit to the diocese of Brownsville, Texas. Stops included Mass at the Shrine of Our Lady of San Juan del Valle with the community, a visit to anHHS/OBR Shelter and Mass for the families there, a visit to the Customs and Border Patrol processing center in McAllen, TX, and a press conference at the end of their visit. Catholic News Service accompanied the bishops on their border trip. 

  1. Backgrounder and analysis of the bishops’ trip to the border: Cardinal DiNardo told CNS, “You cannot look at immigration as an abstraction when you meet” the people behind the issue.
  2. At final press conference, Cardinal Daniel Dinardo said the church was willing to be part of any conversation to find humane solutions because even a policy of detaining families together in facilities caused “concern.”
  3. Bishops serve soup to immigrant families at a center run by Catholic Charities and listen to their stories. Scranton Bishop Joseph Bambera said he found hope in hearing the people in the room talk about what’s ahead. They didn’t speak of making money but of finding safety for their children, he said, driven by “the most basic instinct to protect your family.”
  4. At an opening Mass he Basilica of Our Lady of San Juan del Valle-National Shrine near McAllen, Texas, Bishop Daniel Flores of Brownsville told Massgoers, “The bishops are visiting here so they can stop and look and talk to people and understand, especially the suffering of many who are amongst us,”

A delegation of U.S. bishops goes on a fact-finding mission at the U.S.-Mexican border to learn more about Central American immigration detention.

Following their visit to an immigrant detention center, U.S. bishops said they are even more determined to call on Congress for comprehensive immigration reform.