August 13, 2022

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Boris Johnson, a disgraced prime minister: experts look closer to the end - International

Boris Johnson, a disgraced prime minister: experts look closer to the end – International

Boris Johnson is sticking to his prime ministership and says he will focus on “issues of great importance facing the country”. (Photo: Jessica Taylor/UK Parliament/AFP)

BRASILIA — After 1,079 days in power, Boris Johnson is facing the worst phase of his government: an unprecedented rebellion among his own allies, amid a moral, ethical and political crisis. At the end of this edition, 15 ministers and 29 advisers have resigned since Tuesday. A group of experienced ministers including Priti Patel (Home) and Grand Shops (Transport) met the Prime Minister and tried unsuccessfully to persuade him to step down. Johnson remained adamant and promised to remain in charge of the United Kingdom. Sources in Downing Street, the seat of government, said the Conservative leader would focus on “issues of great importance facing the country”.

By the end of the night, Johnson had three more hits. Michael Gove, the housing minister and one of her key political advisers, was removed from her post after the prime minister resigned. Attorney General Suella Braverman agreed that “it’s time for the Prime Minister to step down.” Health Minister Ed Arger resigned along with the rebels. He is the 15th minister to resign – the most in 90 years. James Duttridge, the prime minister’s parliamentary private secretary, told CNN that Johnson is “fighting to think he can win.”

Labor opposition leader Keir Starmer accused the prime minister of putting on “a pathetic display in the last act of his political career”. Johnson’s new astral hell began on Tuesday night when ministers Sajid Javid (SAT) and Rishi Sunak (FINANA) announced their resignations. This time, the final straw was the appointment of conservative Chris Fincher to a key parliamentary post. Pinscher resigned last week after admitting chasing two men, including a deputy, at a private club in central London. He also admitted that he was drunk. Downing Street reported in 2019 that Johnson was aware of the previous allegations against Fincher but had “forgotten” them.

Prime Minister (again)
(Photo: PRU/AFP)

“It’s over” Experts have almost brought the Johnson administration to an end. “Boris Johnson’s chances of staying in power are close to zero. It’s clear that every member of his parliamentary group has decided it’s time for him to step down. Now, Johnson needs to get the message across to him. There’s no more resistance. That your exit will be hours or days rather than weeks.” I think so,” said Andrew Bligh, director of the Department of Political Economy at King’s College London. “The real issue is that the Conservative Party is overwhelmingly opposed to him continuing as prime minister; the ministerial resignations are an expression of this trend,” he added. “Boris Johnson is over. Maybe his departure is today, maybe in a few days or weeks,” bets Anthony Cleese, emeritus professor at the University of Buckingham.

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The British expert explained that Johnson had lost faith in his own party and country. “44 resignations in government means he is doomed. The longer he waits, the more his lies reinforce the view that he has lost all touch with reality,” he said. According to Cleese, the prime minister has no power and can no longer make decisions. “His long line of lies means no one else believes a word he says. Johnson can’t take that back,” he admitted.

“The coming days will reveal who can take over if the government pursues the crazy fantasy of a hard Brexit (divorce from the European Union) or if the new prime minister tries to forge a new relationship with the coalition.” In turn, Nick Turnbull – Professor of Politics at the Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Manchester – said the mass resignations recorded in recent hours were something rarely seen in British politics. “This indicates that much of the parliamentary session has not only lost faith in the Prime Minister. Many MPs simply do not want to be associated with a Johnson-led government. Gove’s resignation is a direct punishment for betrayal. Premi is attacking. And doing what he can to hold on to power.”

Turnbull understands that Johnson’s efforts to hang on to power are a gift to Labor. According to him, the government is falling. “The more the Prime Minister tries to stay in office, the more electoral support will shift to Labor and the Liberal Democrats. Members of the Conservative Party will not allow this to continue,” he concluded.

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Reasons for the Conservative Rebellion

Two and a half years after his landslide election victory, Boris Johnson is experiencing a hemorrhaging of support within his own Conservative ranks. Understand the reasons

» “Particate”

During the lockdown imposed by Boris Johnson, Christmas parties, farewells, birthdays and celebrations took place in Downing Street Gardens – the seat of government and the Prime Minister’s official residence. The scam was named “Particate”. Scotland Yard (Metropolitan Police) investigated and imposed 126 fines, including Johnson, the first incumbent to be sanctioned for breaking the law. Johnson accepted “all responsibility” but refused to step down and his legitimacy suffered.

“A difference of opinion

The lucrative lobbying efforts of some conservative representatives sparked outrage. Representative Owen Patterson has been accused of lobbying the government on behalf of two companies that paid him. Johnson tried to change the rules to prevent suspension from parliament and received an avalanche of criticism that forced him to back down.

» Luxurious works in your apartment

The Prime Minister said she paid out of her own pocket to lavishly refurbish the official apartment where she and her family live in Downing Street. However, she received a donation she later had to return from a wealthy Conservative Party sympathizer and was fined by the Electoral Commission for failing to declare it.

» A sign of infection

At the start of the pandemic, Johnson was heavily criticized for his mismanagement, accused of not acting quickly enough and not protecting healthcare professionals and nursing home patients. A large proportion of their own Conservative MPs rebelled, voting against the introduction of a health passport to access key events, which was endorsed by a Labor opposition vote. However, Johnson has managed to overcome criticism of his handling of Covid-19 by relying on a successful vaccination campaign.

» Cost of living crisis

Runaway inflation in the UK hit a 40-year record, rising to 9% year-on-year in May, hurting the popularity of the government, which has been accused of not doing enough to help struggling families at the end of the month. Nadim Zahavi, who inherited the finance ministry after the resignation of Rishi Sunak, said tackling the cost-of-living crisis would be a difficult task.

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» Pincher Scandal

Johnson admitted in February that he had made a “mistake” in appointing Chris Fincher as deputy leader of the Conservative Parliamentary Group, in charge of regulating its representatives. Pinzer resigned last week after being accused of sexually assaulting two men. Downing Street acknowledged on Tuesday that the prime minister had been informed of earlier allegations against Mr Fincher, saying he had “forgotten” them.

Overview

The only hope

“If Boris Johnson called an early general election for Queen Elizabeth II, it would be widely interpreted as a constitutional abuse. It would cause electoral damage to the Conservative Party and would almost certainly end Johnson’s career, as well as further damage his reputation. .The election should not be called, and for some reason the party has put him on summer break. His only hope seems to be that something will happen to rescue him from his present difficulties, without preempting it.

Andrew Bligh

Director of the Department of Political Economy at King’s College London

Risk of extinction

“If the Conservative Party doesn’t get rid of Boris Johnson soon, it will face its own demise from within its own structure. Most British citizens are decent and won’t be fooled. The Prime Minister could try to engage Queen Elizabeth.” II and , in theory, dissolve Parliament to hold early general elections. But I don’t think it will happen because he doesn’t have parliamentary majority. I don’t rule out a crack in the Conservative Party.”

Anthony Cleese

Professor Emeritus at the University of Buckingham (UK).

No life

“Boris Johnson has no chance of staying on as Prime Minister. He can cling to the excuse that the 1922 (parliament) committee has not started a confidence motion and cannot do so until June 2023. However, MPs can change that. Rules and maneuvers are on the way to get votes for it. Within the party. Johnson’s support was depleted. His electoral coalition collapsed in the polls, losing seats to left-wing Labor and right-wing Liberal Democrats.”

Nick Turnbull

Professor of Politics at the University of Manchester (UK).